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Exceptional Everyday Art by Subodh Gupta

What is art according to you? A painted canvas, molded clay, etched glass! These are the things which strike into our minds when we listen to the word ‘art’. But we can learn the real meaning of art from Suobodh Gupta, a person who makes masterpieces of art from

something which we never relate with art and that is the daily household kitchen utensils used in almost every kitchen in India.

Art is the product or process of deliberately arranging items (often with symbolic significance) in a way that influences and affects one or more of the senses, emotions, and intellect. It encompasses a diverse range of human activities, creations, and modes of expression,including music, literature, film, photography, sculpture, and paintings. The meaning of art is explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics, whereas disciplines such as anthropology, sociology and psychology analyze its relationship with humans and generations.

-Wikipedia

 

Introduction

 

Subodh Gupta
Subodh Gupta

Subodh Gupta (born in 1964) is an artist based in New Delhi. He was born in Khagaul, land famous for ancient mathemetician Aryabhatta in Patna. He studied at the College of Art, Patna in 1983 – 1988, before moving to New Delhi where he currently lives and works.  His work encompasses sculpture, installation, painting, photography, performance and video.

 

Workpieces

 

ind shut down”, 2008, Stainless steel, old utensils, 240 x 150 x 205 cm / 94 1/2 x 59 x 80 3/4 inches.
ind shut down”, 2008, Stainless steel, old utensils, 240 x 150 x 205 cm / 94 1/2 x 59 x 80 3/4 inches.

 

Gandhi’s three monkeys (detail), 2007—2008 Bronze, old utensils, steel Helmet head: 175 x 125 x 150 cm / 68 7/8 x 49 1/4 x 59 in Photo: A. Burger
Gandhi’s three monkeys (detail), 2007—2008 Bronze, old utensils, steel Helmet head: 175 x 125 x 150 cm / 68 7/8 x 49 1/4 x 59 in Photo: A. Burger

 

Gandhi’s three monkeys (detail), 2007—2008 Bronze, old utensils, steel Balaclava head: 200 x 131 x 155 cm / 78 3/4 x 51 5/8 x 61 in Photo: A. Burger
Gandhi’s three monkeys (detail), 2007—2008 Bronze, old utensils, steel Balaclava head: 200 x 131 x 155 cm / 78 3/4 x 51 5/8 x 61 in Photo: A. Burger

 

Installation view, ‘Faith Matters’, PinchukArtCentre, Kiev, Ukraine, 2010
Installation view, ‘Faith Matters’, PinchukArtCentre, Kiev, Ukraine, 2010

 

Installation view, Sara Hildén Art Museum, Tampere, Finland, 2011 Photo: Jussi Koivunen
Installation view, Sara Hildén Art Museum, Tampere, Finland, 2011 Photo: Jussi Koivunen

 

Untitled, 2008, Oil and enamel on canvas. 228 x 167 cm / 89 3/4 x 65 3/4 inch.
Untitled, 2008, Oil and enamel on canvas. 228 x 167 cm / 89 3/4 x 65 3/4 inch.

 

U.F.O 2007  Brass utensils 114 x 305 x 305 cm
U.F.O 2007  Brass utensils 114 x 305 x 305 cm

U.F.O 2007 is another work made up of hundreds of brass water utensils that are soldered together to resemble a flying saucer. This gleaming sculpture is amusing yet pertinent to ideas of sustainability, poverty and notions of otherness. The repetition of forms and the exaggeration of scale is a common element in Gupta’s work.

 

Still Steal Steel #1
Still Steal Steel #1

Gupta’s painting Still Steal Steel is a strange juxtaposition of a still life of steel utensils in the fore-ground, with a slightly garish floral design in the background. Gupta employs the effectiveness of a hyper-realist palette that suggests that the objects are more real than reality might allow. Gupta’s configuration of steel utensils along with the introduction of a floral element appears to reference a hierarchy of decorative forms.


Untitled (Pot) 2004 Oil on canvas 168 x 229 cm
Untitled (Pot) 2004 Oil on canvas 168 x 229 cm

With Untitled (Pot) Gupta manages to elevate his ready-mades to positions of grandeur. His still-life paintings appear to celebrate objects in space almost as successfully as his ready-mades do. Row upon row of copper based utensils and tiffin-tins hang from a kitchen ceiling. Gupta’s paintings transform the objects to appear more valuable than usual.


Spill 2007 Stainless steel and stainless steel utensils 170 x 145h x 95 cm
Spill 2007 Stainless steel and stainless steel utensils 170 x 145h x 95 cm

Subodh Gupta employs many of the original techniques of French conceptualist Marcel Duchamp by elevating the ready-made into an art object. Gupta chooses signature objects of the Indian sub-continent and relocates them as art objects in monumental installations of stainless steel and tiffin-tins. Spill is an overbearing work of great scale that has at its centre a larger than life stainless steel water vessel, with many smaller steel utensils spilling over the edge like water pouring out.

 

Other Details

Have a look at Solo show of  Subodh Gupta in London.

 

Further Reading

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subodh_Gupta

Subodh Gupta – Artist’s Profile – The Saatchi Gallery

www.artnet.com/artists/subodhgupta/

About Niteesh Yadav

He is a creative person who likes sketching and designing. He is a self taught graphic designer, illustrator and artist who loves to create new things inspired from his surroundings. # Editor in Chief of Indicreative